27 Jun 07:08

Comic for June 27, 2022

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28 Jun 01:53

Extended NFPA Hazard Diamond

With most labs, the hushed horror stories are about something like dimethylmercury or prions, but occasionally you'll get a weird lab where it's about the soda machine or the drop ceiling.
27 Jun 08:05

Calgon

New Comic: Calgon
27 Jun 13:29

Basic home office hacks: 8 things you need to elevate your workspace

by Scharon Harding
Basic home office hacks: 8 things you need to elevate your workspace

Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson | Getty Images)

Home offices have gotten a lot of attention over the last couple of years. When offices all over the world shut down at the beginning of the pandemic, we were all reminded how important it is to have a consistent, comfortable workspace with all the tools and tech you need to work successfully. But what's next?

If you hastily created your home office during the pandemic, there are likely some luxuries you overlooked (or weren't able to find in stock). If you've shifted to hybrid working, where you sometimes work remotely and sometimes go to an office, some home office upgrades could help ensure you're always productive, regardless of where you're working from. Long-standing home offices, meanwhile, also deserve some fresh hacks to keep up with your evolving needs.

If you're ready to graduate to the next level of home office-ing, take a look at these eight pieces of tech we recommend for elevating your workspace. Today we're focusing on general ideas rather than specific products.

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27 Jun 17:36

Awkward Zombie - The Sharpest Tool

by tech@thehiveworks.com

New comic!

Today's News:

It's not unusual for a sequel to find a way to reset the protagonist's power level, and I don't have a problem with Horizon One Dawn casually hand-waving the subject. I do find it difficult, though, to reconcile with the fact that most of Aloy's tools are things she's capable of mass-producing on the spot with her own two hands and random shrapnel.

27 Jun 04:47

京都の元舞妓「未成年なのに浴びるほど飲酒させられ混浴強要されました」

by dqnplus
1 名前:◆mZB81pkM/el0 (東京都) [ニダ]:2022/06/27(月) 08:39:37.25 ID:byn7j6N+0
000579

Kiyoha@物書き@kiyoha_xxx
この世から抹消されるかもしれんけど、これが舞妓の実態。当時16 歳で浴びるほどのお酒を飲ませられ、お客さんとお風呂入りという名の混浴を強いられた(全力で逃げたけど)。 これが本当に伝統文化なのか今一度かんがえていただきたい。写真はお客さんと山崎18年一気飲み大会で勝利した時と飲酒

https://mobile.twitter.com/kiyoha_xxx/status/1540988041921449985
続きを読む
28 Jun 01:50

Extended NFPA Hazard Diamond

With most labs, the hushed horror stories are about something like dimethylmercury or prions, but occasionally you'll get a weird lab where it's about the soda machine or the drop ceiling.
27 Jun 01:16

She's Got A Lot Going On

Aurelia calm down, you're cool as fuck

27 Jun 10:46

Chapter 85: Page 27

Doesn't seem likely...
27 Jun 07:24

Girl Genius for Monday, June 27, 2022

The Girl Genius comic for Monday, June 27, 2022 has been posted.
27 Jun 10:55

Calgon

New Comic: Calgon
27 Jun 11:52

Republican calls overturning Roe v. Wade a 'victory for white life'

by The Associated Press
U.S. Rep. Mary Miller of Illinois, speaking at a rally Saturday night with former U.S. President Donald Trump, called the Supreme Court's decision overturning Roe v. Wade a 'victory for white life.'
28 Jun 17:43

People are getting explosive gastroenteritis at the Grand Canyon

by Beth Mole
The Grand Canyon viewed from the South Rim adjacent to the El Tovar Hotel on November 11, 2019, in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

Enlarge / The Grand Canyon viewed from the South Rim adjacent to the El Tovar Hotel on November 11, 2019, in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. (credit: Getty | George Rose)

The Grand Canyon is an immense, vibrantly painted geological wonder, treasured for its awe-inspiring stratified architecture, which has been spectacularly sculpted over millions of years. Up close, it will blow your mind and take your breath away—and if you've visited recently, it may also violently flush your colon and have you projectile vomiting your granola bars.

That's right—the majestic natural wonder has been the site of a months-long outbreak of gastrointestinal illness, likely caused by norovirus. The virus was confirmed to be the cause of illnesses among at least eight rafting trips. Overall, more than 150 river rafters and backcountry campers have fallen ill since April, according to a recent update from the Grand Canyon National Park Service.

While many may have sought the outdoor grandeur in hopes of avoiding the pandemic coronavirus, it seems they were instead met with a different germ that has been savagely hollowing out innards at a pace many orders of magnitude faster than the Colorado River gutted the southwestern section of the Colorado Plateau. Amid the smoothly carved buttes and intricately chiseled chasms serenely shaped over eons, park-goers are blowing chunks from both ends in hot seconds. And instead of reaching both the North and South Rims during their visits, some are forced to remain perched on the edge of a far smaller basin.

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28 Jun 07:02

Comic for June 28, 2022

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28 Jun 21:32

Modern City Dwellers Have Lost About Half Their Gut Microbes

by msmash
Comparing genomes of intestinal bacteria in various primates and human populations begins to pinpoint the possibly helpful microbes that have gone missing from our guts. From a report: Deep in the human gut, myriad "good" bacteria and other microbes help us digest our food, as well as keep us healthy by affecting our immune, metabolic, and nervous systems. Some of these humble microbial assistants have been in our guts since before humans became human -- certain gut microbes are found in almost all primates, suggesting they first colonized a common ancestor. But humans have also lost many of these helpers found in other primates and may be losing even more as people around the world continue to flock to cities, a researcher reported last week at a microbiology meeting in Washington, D.C. Those absent gut microbes could affect human health, he says. "This work helps us develop a new understanding of the course of human biological and cultural development," says Lev Tsypin, a microbiology graduate student at the California Institute of Technology who was not involved in the new study. The microbiome comprises all the bacteria, fungi, viruses, and other microscopic life that inhabit an individual, be it a person, a plant, or a planaria. For humans and many other species, the best characterized microbiome centers on the bacteria in the gut. The more microbiologists study these gut microbes, the more they link the bacteria to functions of their hosts. In humans, for example, gut bacteria influence how the immune system responds to pathogens and allergens, or interact with the brain, affecting mood. Andrew Moeller, an evolutionary biologist at Cornell University, was one of the first to show that gut bacteria and humans have built these relationships over a very long time. Six years ago, he and colleagues reported the work showing human gut microbes are very similar to those in other primates, suggesting their intestinal presence predates the evolution of humans. But his follow-up studies, and work by others, also indicate the human gut microbiome has, in a general sense, become less diverse than the gut microbes in our current primate cousins. One study found 85 microbial genera, such as Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium, in the guts of wild apes, but just 55 in people in U.S. cities. Splitting the difference, people in less developed parts of the world have between 60 and 65 of those bacterial groups, an observation that ties the decrease in microbial diversity to urbanization.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

29 Jun 07:01

Comic for June 29, 2022

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29 Jun 11:47

Couple bought home in Seattle, then learned Comcast Internet would cost $27,000

by Jon Brodkin
Couple bought home in Seattle, then learned Comcast Internet would cost $27,000

Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson | Getty Images)

When Zachary Cohn and his wife bought a house in the Northgate neighborhood of Seattle, Washington, they didn't expect any trouble getting home Internet service. It was only after closing on the house in July 2019 that they learned the bad news. "All six neighbors I share a property line with are wired for Comcast, but our house never was," Cohn told Ars.

Comcast had wired up the neighborhood with cable decades earlier and provides high-speed broadband to the abutting properties. But the cable TV and Internet service provider never extended a line to the house purchased by Cohn and his wife, Lauryl Zenobi.

Cohn spent many months trying to get answers from Comcast on how he and Zenobi could get Internet service. Eventually, he contacted his City Councillor's office, which was able to get a real response from Comcast.

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